SAMPLE CLIP FROM “ME DEAR LOVE”

The following is a draft sample from the book, “Me Dear Love.”  Please remember this is a work-in-progress and will see many revisions in the future.  This is just a taste for now…

As the schooner sailed full mast into Harbour Breton, a flotilla sailed out to meet the ship. Crowds on shore cheered loudly.  They clapped and waved, hanging on to the shoulders of young children to prevent them from getting too close to the water.

“Look here,” Pete said. Eddie turned to see families leaving the comforts of their homes to see the ship. Captain Ellis had made plans with some of the older, retired fishermen to get them aboard, see if they recall all the subtleties inherent to the ship. The CBC crew were already setting up their cameras and looking for a good vantage point for the best light.

“There’ll be some tears with this story!” Lynette said, startling Pete and Eddie.

“You’re interviewing some crew?”

“No the interview is for the older men.  These guys would live on a ship like this for weeks at a time.  They have a ton of memories.”

Suddenly two cannons were shot.  One right after the other. The sound reverberated from land over the water and into the proud chests of the Grand Banks Schooner crew. The captain lit the fuse of the small brass cannon aboard the ship and, symbolically, fired.  Guests cheered.

Other ships, ferries, sailboats, and barges crowded the inlet and crowds had gathered along the shore in the distance, like outcrops of the rock itself, sat a multitude of colourful houses: brick red, deep purple, yellow, and green. People aboard the Grand Banks had their cameras out, creating videos of the majestic sights while the people of Breton Harbour stood opposite the ship, doing the same.

Pete came up behind Eddie and placed a hand on his shoulder. “This is it,” he said. For a moment, Eddie was speechless.

“It’s overwhelming.”

There had been times on the ship when Eddie didn’t think about finding his mother. During those times, he was just another guest having a good time. But now, as he prepared to disembark, thoughts of is mother were front and centre.

Hundreds of raised hands waved to the guests and crew of the schooner. Eddie raised a hand and waved back.

*I’m one of you* Eddie wanted to shout at the flotilla. *I was born here!* But he said nothing. He and Pete retreated to the berth where they gathered their bags and proceeded to disembark. As they waited in line, crew member shook hands, thanked them for being guests.  Other guests exchanged phone numbers and emails, having made new friends.

As the schooner sailed full mast into Harbour Breton, a flotilla sailed out to meet the ship. Crowds on shore cheered loudly.  They clapped and waved, hanging on to the shoulders of young children to prevent them from getting too close to the water.

“Look here,” Pete said. Eddie turned to see families leaving the comforts of their homes to see the ship. Captain Ellis had made plans with some of the older, retired fishermen to get them aboard, see if they recall all the subtleties inherent to the ship. The CBC crew were already setting up their cameras and looking for a good vantage point for the best light.

“There’ll be some tears with this story!” Lynette said, startling Pete and Eddie.

“You’re interviewing some crew?”

“No the interview is for the older men.  These guys would live on a ship like this for weeks at a time.  They have a ton of memories.”

Suddenly two cannons were shot.  One right after the other. The sound reverberated from land over the water and into the proud chests of the Grand Banks Schooner crew. The captain lit the fuse of the small brass cannon aboard the ship and, symbolically, fired.  Guests cheered.

Other ships, ferries, sailboats, and barges crowded the inlet and crowds had gathered along the shore in the distance, like outcrops of the rock itself, sat a multitude of colourful houses: brick red, deep purple, yellow, and green. People aboard the Grand Banks had their cameras out, creating videos of the majestic sights while the people of Breton Harbour stood opposite the ship, doing the same.

Pete came up behind Eddie and placed a hand on his shoulder. “This is it,” he said. For a moment, Eddie was speechless.

“It’s overwhelming.”

There had been times on the ship when Eddie didn’t think about finding his mother. During those times, he was just another guest having a good time. But now, as he prepared to disembark, thoughts of is mother were front and centre.

Hundreds of raised hands waved to the guests and crew of the schooner. Eddie raised a hand and waved back.

I’m one of you Eddie wanted to shout. I was born here!  But he said nothing. He and Pete retreated to the berth where they gathered their bags and proceeded to disembark.